Nishimura Junko (2009.8.6) Socioeconomic status and mental health in East Asia. 2009 Summer Meeting of Research Committee 28, International Sociological Association (at Yale University).

Bibliographical Information

Category:
Presentation
Number:
p170
Author:
Nishimura Junko || 西村 純子
Date:
2009.8.6
Title:
Socioeconomic status and mental health in East Asia
Source:
2009 Summer Meeting of Research Committee 28, International Sociological Association (at Yale University)
Page:
URL:
http://www.yale.edu/ciqle/rc28/abstracts/Abstract09.3.30%28Nishimura%29.pdf
Abstract:
Many research conducted in the U.S. reveals fairly consistent patterns in the relationship between one’s socioeconomic status and mental health. However, it is not clear whether these patterns are common in other societies. If differences in stress experiences arise from unequal allocations of resources, power, and status, relationship between one’s socioeconomic status and mental health differs by societies with different social arrangements. This is the reason why comparative study on the relationship between socioeconomic status and mental health between different societies is needed. // East Asian societies (in this study, Japan, Korea, and China) are assumed to share many of the same cultural patterns, because these societies have religiously common background, Confucianism and Buddhism. However, these societies have started the process of industrialization at different time points, hence are in different stage of modernization, are administered by different government structures, and have different systems of social security. These institutional differences are assumed to make the impact of socioeconomic factors on their mental health different in these societies. // Therefore, I hypothesize that socioeconomic factors which relate significantly to mental health are different between East Asian societies. // Analyses are based on data drawn from National Family Research Japan 2003, Korea National Family Survey 2003, and Chinese Family Survey 2006. All data consist of nationally representative samples. Men and women aged 20-60 are selected. // Results of ordinary least squares regression show that 1) educational attainment shows significant relationship with depression in Korea, but not in Japan and China, 2) men’s occupational status significantly relates to their depression level only in Japan, 3) household income shows significant relationship with depression for Chinese men and women, and Japanese women. Based on these results, differences of institutional settings in East Asian societies, and their impacts on mental health will be discussed.
Keywords:
Note:
Relation:
Dataset:
[NFRJ03]
Created: 2012-02-20. Updated: 2012-03-28.

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